Symposium: Legal History and Comparative Law: A Dialogue in Times of the Transnationalization of Law and Legal Scholarship

April 05, 2019

The two disciplines of legal history and comparative law are not only closely linked historically, they also face similar challenges today. How do they deal with the de-nationalization and de-Europeanization of their categories? What new criteria and categories of comparison are replacing the previously used ones?

The contributions to a symposium in the current issue of The American Journal of Comparative Law (04/2018) edited by Thomas Duve illustrate how legal historians are responding to these challenges – and thus also reveal the potential for a more intensive dialogue between the two disciplines.

Symposium: Legal History and Comparative Law: A Dialogue in Times of the Transnationalization of Law and Legal Scholarship

Contributions

1.
Thomas Duve
Preface
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 727–731
2.
Heikki Pihlajamäki
Merging Comparative Law and Legal History: Towards an Integrated Discipline
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 733–750
3.
Alessandro Somma
Global Legal History, Legal Systemology, and the Genealogy of Law
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 751–768
4.
Kentaro Matsubara
East, East, and West: Comparative Law and the Historical Processes of Legal Interaction in China and Japan
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 769–789
5.
Carlos Petit
Due Process and Civil Procedure, or How to Do Codes with Theories
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 791–810
6.
Daniel Damler
The Synesthesia of Values: How the Ideals of Modernist Design Predisposed and Shaped Fascist Legal and Political Thought
The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 66, Issue 4, 31 December 2018, Pages 811–830
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